Monday, March 17, 2008

They Don't Even Know

If you see an Irishman today, make sure to point out to him that Saint Patrick was actually English.

8 comments:

Jeff Moss said...

I wore a bright orange shirt to Bucer's last night.

Jeff Moss said...

Oh, yes...and according to the Catholic Encyclopedia, Patrick actually was "born at Kilpatrick, near Dumbarton, in Scotland, in the year 387."

I'd say the distinction between England and Scotland is an important one.

Matthew N. Petersen said...

I think we today would call him Welsh--unless he was a Pict. At that time, the Scots live in Ireland, and Ireland was called Scotland (as for instance in Bede). Because of the Irish missionaries to modern Scotland, and because of subsequent migrations, the land of the Picts became Scotland, and what was then Scotland became Ireland.

Anyway, Arthur was about as English as say Arthur.

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Thomas Banks said...

Servator-

Obrigado for the compliment.

Ibid said...

Tom,

What's your family's address (mailing) if I may request it in a place where you get spammed by Asian robots?

elrj said...

Haha, I'm totally with you on that one. Typically I celebrate St Patrick's day with abandon because I think he was such a fascinating character. But this year, the city I live in turned St Patrick's day into St Patrick's weekend and wore kelly-green and drank crap beer for practically four days and I was mentally begging someone to ask me why I wasn't wearing green because I wanted to spring that very question on them "Where was Saint Patrick from, huh? do you even know, because if you do, I'll go home and put on some green."

Thomas Banks said...

Katie-

617 S. Elm. I'm sure you know the rest; I go in fear of oriental droids.